November 2, 2016

From the Pouch

Volume 3, Issue 6–November 2, 2016

 

In Memorium

As many of you have heard, my mother Simona Szafran passed away last week, on October 23, 2016 at 3:00 AM Pacific Time in Las Vegas, Nevada.  This issue of the BLAB is dedicated to telling her life story, and we’ll return to the more usual contents next week.

She passed away at the Nathan Adelson Hospice, receiving wonderful care from my father and from the Hospice’s dedicated staff.  She died peacefully and without pain.  My father, Daniel, had been giving her loving 24-7 care for more than the past year, and had brought her back from death’s door more than once.  On October 23, her time to rejoin her parents came.

My mother was born on May 3, 1935, in Bucharest, Romania.  She was the oldest daughter of Bernard Dulzer, a well-known singer of Romanian folk songs (under his stage name of Bela Chitaristul—Bela the Guitarist) and Clara (Lupu) Dulzer.

My grandfather’s recording of Nunta Tiganeasca, a Romanian song

She is survived by her older brother, Reuven Avihai and her two younger sisters, Shulamit Ronen and Dina Rubin, as well as by husband Daniel, children Zvi and Drorit, and grandson Mark.

As a girl, Simona was an excellent student in many subjects, but she always especially loved languages.  It was an almost impossible time to be a student—she was four years old when World War II began.  Soon thereafter, King Carol II abdicated and the country came under the rule of Ion Antonescu and the anti-Semitic Iron Guard.  The family was caught up in the whirlwind of the Holocaust.  There was hardly any food, the family had to go into hiding at times, her father Bernard was forced to become a slave laborer (which he barely survived).  Her mother Clara kept the family together in a small unheated flat where they often had to subsist on soup and grain made from lobodiza, a local thistle/weed.

She attended the Tarbut School in Bucharest, which was where she learned Hebrew.  At the height of the war, the school had to go underground.  When the children wanted to quit school due to the hardships and danger, Clara would have none of it—she insisted that they keep studying.  When the children said “We may die tomorrow”, Clara said “Then you’ll die educated.”  Even in these most horrible of times, my mother told us of the goodness of strangers—while there were some who closed their eyes to the suffering of those around them, there was a also a family that hid them when things were at there worst, and there was a woman—a stranger—who bought her a winter coat when she saw her shivering in the winter cold.

After the war, she did well enough on an entrance exam to win a scholarship to the Chemical Technical High School in Bucharest, where her older brother Reuven had previously gone (Reuven went on to become a chemist as a profession).  When I first started studying chemistry many years later, my mother would sit down with me and tell me what she remembered from what she had learned so many years earlier, and what the various chemical terms and names were in Romanian.

The communists took over the Romanian government after the war, but a few years later, allowed Jews to leave the country.  Her family took the opportunity to emigrate to Israel in 1950.  Simona lived on a kibbutz for two years, and in 1953, while at a small party, met Daniel Szafran, my father.  Daniel was a Auschwitz survivor who had immigrated to Palestine after World War II, who had joined the underground army and fought in Israel’s War of Independence.  He asked her out on a date, but while she was reluctant since she knew Daniel would be leaving the country in a few months, she agreed.  After a whirlwind courtship, three months later on August 9, they were married.  They were the most loving couple ever, in a romance that lasted 63 years.

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They went to Germany (where my father studied heavy machinery mechanics and his brother Nathan, also an Auschwitz survivor, was part of the American military occupation force) for two years.  When my mother got pregnant, they traveled by train and boat to Israel in the summer of 1955 to give birth to me.

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My mother holding me, at 4 weeks old

Two years later, my sister Drorit was born in 1957.

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L-R:  back:  My uncle Yosef Ronen, Daniel, my aunt Shulamit, Simona.  Front: my cousin Aviram, me, and standing, my sister Drorit.

In 1959, our family moved to Syracuse, NY so that my father could be together with his brother Nathan, who had settled there.

We lived in apartments on Clarendon Street and then on Judson Street in Syracuse before my parents bought the house they still own on Hazelwood Avenue, where we grew up.  Nathan lived two houses down with his family—my aunt Shirley and their two children Karen and Barry.  It was more like one big family—we literally did everything together, seeing each other multiple times every day.

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Visiting New York City:  (L-R) Me, Drorit, my mother, and our cousin Charles Meltzer

As we grew up, Simona was primarily a mother and a housewife, but when I became a teenager, she returned to school, earning an Associates Degree from Onondaga Community College.  I remember quizzing her as she was taking a class in Botany and trying to memorize the various phyla and genera of plants.  After graduating, she continued her education, taking a bus from Syracuse to Cortland early each morning to take her classes, and taking the bus back in the afternoon so she could be back as we returned from school.  She earned her Bachelors Degree (cum laude) in Modern Languages from SUNY Cortland in 1969, and then her Masters Degree in Secondary Education from Cortland in 1971.  I remember how proud I was at each of her graduations.

Simona taught French in the Syracuse public schools at Blodgett Junior High School for a year, and then taught Hebrew at various schools for many years.  The longest tenure was at the Syracuse Hebrew Day School teaching 1st and 2nd grade, where she taught from 1975 to 2001, when she retired.  I remember visiting her beautifully decorated classroom dozens of times over the years, listening to her describe what she was doing in her classes and telling me how much she loved each and every one of her students.  Whenever I would visit Syracuse, I’d always run into several people who told me she was their teacher when they were little.  She leaves a legacy of more than 1000 students who adored her.

Over the years, Simona’s greatest pride came from seeing her children complete their educations and start their careers.  She was so proud when Drorit became a social worker and devoted her life to helping others.  When I completed my doctorate in 1981, she was certainly proud of the chemistry work I had done, but even prouder when I was able to pass the foreign language requirement in French on the first try, since languages were her forte, not mine.  She spoke English, Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Romanian, French, Spanish, and Russian, and could also understand Italian and some Polish.  When we were growing up, whenever my parents wanted to keep something private from us, all they had to do was speak in German or Yiddish. When I started to teach at colleges, earned tenure, and rose up the ranks and became a dean and then a vice president, we would always talk about teaching strategies and she would want to be sure that I was providing support for my faculty.

Simona’s only grandchild, my son Mark, was born in 1984.  She and my father came to Salem, NH to see us a few days after the birth.  From the minute she and Mark looked at each other, it was a mutual love at first sight.  Mark would always call her ‘my Mona’.

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We always took our vacations together, going all over the U.S., Canada, and Israel on trips.

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When Mark, who is developmentally challenged, was studying for his Bar Mitzvah, she helped teach him the Hebrew alphabet so that he could read the prayers.  I remember we were driving on vacation in Maine and Nova Scotia, with my parents in one car and us in the other, and Mark insisted on riding in their car.  It was Mona who taught him the blessings over the Torah on a single morning as were driving toward Halifax through the power of pure love.  When he successfully completed his Bar Mitzvah ceremony and realized he was finished, it was Mona that he immediately ran to first—to kiss and hug her.  There wasn’t a dry eye in the synagogue.

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After retirement, my parents lived in Las Vegas during the winter months and Syracuse as the weather got warmer.  Each spring, they would drive from Las Vegas to Houston to see Drorit, then to Marietta, GA to see my family, and then to Syracuse to spend the summer with their friends.  Every October, they’d do the reverse drive.  When I became President at SUNY Canton, they came up from Syracuse to help me move in, planning to stay for two weeks.  They wound up staying until December, because they enjoyed it so much.  We bought a house together in Canton which had a wing for them with their own bedroom and bathroom.  They were in Canton for my inauguration.  When the post-inauguration party ended with me playing the guitar with three colleagues in a college band we had formed to play at Open House events, she came over after we finished, and said I had reminded her of her father when he played the guitar.

Simona loved to dance with my father.  Over the years, they would dance at every ceremony and event they were at.  When we went on a cruise together, they danced every night.  They were so good at it, people would stop their own dancing to watch them, and people all over the ship were talking about them.  At my inauguration, the local newspapers published a picture of them dancing together.  The plan was for my parents to spend the cold months in Las Vegas and the warm months in Canton and we did that for two years, but Simona’s health failed her then and she could no longer travel.

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The hardest part about my mother’s decline was her almost total memory loss.  She could remember some of the past, but not what had happened even one minute earlier.  As memories faded, the last things she remembered were that she had been a teacher for a long time, her appreciation for languages and music, and her love for my father.  She would only let my father take care of her, but fortunately, she would often mistake me for him so she was willing to go places with me and to let me help her.  I flew out to Las Vegas to see her as the end approached.  I still could see the endless love between my parents as my father cared for her.  In a final blessing, she had some lucid moments during the visit when she told me (in Hebrew) how she had loved being a teacher.  We were even able to speak a little French to each other.

I will always remember her as the vibrant, loving, and brilliant woman she was, who gave me my love of chemistry, music, education, and teaching.  She’s reunited with her parents in heaven now, and I can see her listening and dancing while her father sings, waiting patiently and watching over us until it’s our time to join her.  Rest In Peace, Ima.

 

Last Time’s Trivia Contest

Last time’s contest dealt with word that begin with the letter “N”.  Our fastest responder with all five correct was Allison Farnung.  Just come to my office on the 6th floor of MacArthur Hall to get your prize, Allison—a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.

Others getting all four right (so better luck next time!) included Jennifer Blair, Lee Meggison, Ashley Paez, Alicia Febus, Erwin Mahler III, and Cory Rolince.

 

Here are the correct answers:

    1. Place with five boroughs, and the Bronx is up and The Battery is down.  New York, New York.
    2. Service that streams movies and some TV shows.  Netflix.
    3. Gaming company that is behind Super Mario Brothers and sells the 3DS and Wii platforms.  Nintendo.
    4. Stage name for rapper Christopher George Latore Wallace, who was killed in 1997. His album Life After Death was released 16 days later, and rose to #1 on the charts.  Notorious BIG.

 

This Time’s Trivia Challenge

No trivia contest this week–a new contest will reappear in the next issue.

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October 14, 2016

FROM THE POUCH

Volume 3, Issue 5–October 14, 2016

 

 

Recent Activities on Diversity at SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton is a diverse college, and our credo is ‘Everyone is Welcome Here’.  It’s critically important that we respond to the needs and aspirations of our diverse community in a variety of ways.  We’ve already had several events on campus this semester, starting with the three vigils that took place the first week and including a student open forum, all sponsored by our Student Government and our Co-Chief Diversity Officers, Lashawanda Ingram and Bill Jones.  Many more events and discussions are planned during the rest of the year.

There were several interesting events on diversity that took place yesterday.  The first was a workshop titled Diversity Affairs: Building our Capacity for Greater Inclusion, which was offered to SUNY Canton faculty and staff.  The workshop was led by the Reverend Dr. Jamie Washington, one of the top national experts on this subject.  Dr. Washington, president of the Washington Consulting Group located in Baltimore, has worked with more than 300 organizations over his 30-year career.  The workshop was well attended, with about 50 people participating including me.

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Dr. Washington talked about how to have productive conversations about diversity and how to recognize that we’re all complex combinations of different attributes—race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ability, etc.  Whenever we enter any room or conversation, our attributes come into the room with us and become part of the context of what happens next.  What’s important is that we also enter the room with an open mind, welcome all different perspectives (though welcoming does not necessarily mean we need to agree with those perspectives or change our own), provide a space where people feel free to share their thoughts without fear of retribution or being attacked, and even allow ourselves to have fun and laugh at ourselves.  He made the point that depending on what attribute we’re focusing on, we may be in the privileged group, or we may be in the non-privileged group.  The goal is to take steps to bring the two groups closer together in action and in understanding.  The workshop was very well received by the audience, and everyone enjoyed participating in several activities to raise awareness of various aspects of diversity.

Dr. Washington also presented a talk focusing on similar themes (‘Building Capacity for Leadership’) for students and the general public last evening.  The audience was moderate in size but quite enthusiastic.  I’m glad I attended both events, and learned a lot.

Also taking place yesterday was a four hour symposium titled Enough is Enough: Understanding the New College Anti-Sexual Assault Law and Building Partnerships, sponsored by Renewal House and the SUNY Canton University Police.  Renewal House is an organization in town that offers support to victims of sexual assault and domestic violence in St. Lawrence County.

There were three sessions at the symposium:

  • Understanding the Requirement in Education Law 129B “Enough is Enough
  • Developing Community Collaborations, and
  • Understanding the Needs of LGBTQ+ Students and Students of Color.

The first and last sessions were led by Michelle Carroll, the Campus Coordinator for the New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault (NYSCASA), and the second session by our own Amanda Rowley and Renewal House’s Campus Advocate, Angelica Soto.

The symposium was well attended by a mix of students, faculty and staff, all of our SUNY Canton University Police, and police from the Village of Canton and from SUNY Potsdam.

I’ve mentioned that we will be opening our Center for Diversities and Inclusion on campus soon.  At this point, we’re waiting for the furniture to arrive (it should be any time now), and then as soon as we can arrange it, we’ll have a grand opening.

  

Art at SUNY Canton

We’re starting up an Art Exhibit series at SUNY Canton, hopefully to begin with about two exhibits a semester.  Our first exhibit will feature watercolor paintings by Jay Waronker on the subject of Synagogues in Sub-Saharan Africa.  These synagogues are located in many countries, including Ethiopia, Mozambique, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.  Waronker, a Professor of Architecture at my previous campus of Southern Polytechnic State University, noted “Most people are inclined to look at Africa as this homogenous place, but there is tremendous diversity from country to country, synagogue to synagogue.”  You can read more about his work here.

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The exhibit and artist’s talk will begin at 6:00 PM on October 17 in the Southworth Library.  Refreshments will be served.

A similar exhibit and talk on Synagogues in India will be presented at Congregation Beth El in Potsdam on October 16 at 2:00 PM.

  

Sustainability Day

Back on Friday September 30, I drove over to Clarkson University, where I participated in a symposium on sustainability.  Clarkson’s president Tony Collins provided a very tasty lunch at his house for Dr. Peter Bardaglio (the symposium’s keynote speaker), the sustainability officers from the four colleges (SUNY Canton, SUNY Potsdam, Clarkson, and St. Lawrence University) in the St. Lawrence Valley, and me.  After eating and a nice conversation, we walked over to the student center.

logoAfter an opening and welcome from the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne, I was part of the President’s Panel, which was moderated by North Country Public Radio’s David Summerstein.  I’ve met David before on several occasions, and very much enjoy his radio show (The Beat Authority, Fridays from 3-5 pm) which focuses on very cool worldwide dance music.  David asked us a number of questions about how we defined sustainability, how we were implementing it on our campuses, and what the challenges were in trying to change the culture so that there would be a greater awareness of issues related to sustainability.  The panel went very well, and I enjoyed participating.  Among the 100 or so people in the audience were several from SUNY Canton, as well several friends of mine from the community.  

 

ACT Meeting

Right after the Sustainability Day panel, I had to run back to the car to drive to Fairport NY (not far from Rochester, about 4 hours away), where I was attending the annual SUNY Association of Council Members and College Trustees meeting.  I got there about 6:30, just in time to check in and get to the opening dinner at 7:00.

The conference was held at the Woodcliff Hotel and Spa, which is a very nice place.  It has beautiful grounds including a very large swimming pool, a beautiful interior, and my room was large and attractive.  The food at the dinner was very good, and I got the chance to renew acquaintance with several college council members and trustees who I’d met the year before.

There were several updates, talks, and tool-box sessions on Saturday, but the highlight was the ACT Scholarship Luncheon.  SUNY Canton student Francesco Palumbo was one of four statewide winners of the ACT Scholarship, and the four were an impressive bunch, all having excellent scholastic achievements and having plans to go on to do great things.

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Francesco is on the right.

I sat at the same table as Francesco’s family, and there’s no question where he gets his friendly personality from—they are among the nicest people I’ve ever met.

 

That evening, I took advantage of the area and went out to my favorite type of restaurant—an Indian restaurant about 4 miles away.  The Deluxe Dinner for One (as they called it) was magnificent—a mixed grill of tandoori chicken and shrimp, chicken tikka, and vegetables; a side dish of chicken curry; basmati rice; and naan.  A mango laasi drink was included, as was some kheer (rice pudding) for dessert.  I did my best, but couldn’t finish it all!

The conference concluded on Sunday morning with a session on the Educational Opportunity Program and a business session.  I drove home, stopping in Syracuse for lunch.  What kind of restaurant?  Another Indian restaurant, of course, just off of Electronics Parkway that had a nice buffet.  I was still well stuffed when I got back to Canton. 

 

What Is “FROM THE POUCH”?

FROM THE POUCH is a blog I write for SUNY Canton students.  During the fall and spring semesters, it comes out every week more or less, depending on how busy I am.  It consists of news, answers to student questions, and random thoughts that cross my mind.  There’s even a trivia contest in each issue—if you’re the first to get every question right, you win a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.  Even if you’re not the first, you get your name published in the blog, and that’s priceless!  I hope you enjoy it, and I’d love to hear your comments.

Best regards,

Dr. Zvi Szafran

President, SUNY Canton

 

 

Last Time’s Trivia Contest

Last time’s contest dealt with word that begin with the letter “M”.  We had a ton of entrants, and our fastest responder with all five correct was Breanna Ziser.  Just come to my office on the 6th floor of MacArthur Hall to get your prize, Breanna—a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.

Others getting all four right (so better luck next time!) included Concetta Smythe, Rieanna Dupree, Cassandra Jones, Randi Conway, Lee Meggison, Siani Smith, Allison Farnung, Charles Hanby, Serina Six, Ashley Paez, and Bryant Yates.

Here are the correct answers:

  1. The “King of Pop”. Michael Jackson.
  2. She played Hannah Montana, and taught the world how to twerk. Miley Cyrus.
  3. Comic book company that publishes Spider-Man, the Avengers, and the X-Men. Marvel Comics.
  4. Movie about a zebra, lion, hippo, giraffe and a bunch of penguins that escape from the Central Park Zoo.  Madagascar.

 

 

This Time’s Trivia Challenge

Continuing our trek through the alphabet, this issue’s challenge is about words that begin with the letter “N”. The first with all five correct wins a $10 Gift Card, good anywhere on campus. No looking up the answers now!  SEND ALL ENTRIES BY EMAIL TO answers@canton.edu since if you put them as a response on the BLOG, everyone will be able to see them.

  1. Place with five boroughs, and the Bronx is up and The Battery is down.
  2. Service that streams movies and some TV shows.
  3. Gaming company that is behind Super Mario Brothers and sells the 3DS and Wii platforms.
  4. Stage name for rapper Christopher George Latore Wallace, who was killed in 1997. His album Life After Death was released 16 days later, and rose to #1 on the charts.

 

 

 

 

 

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September 30, 2016

FROM THE POUCH

Volume 3, Issue 4–September 30, 2016

 

 

Things Can Get Very Busy, But Contact Me Anyway!

As most of you are aware, I give out my phone number to students because I want you to call me if there’s ever a situation where you’ve tried to go up the chain of command, but haven’t been able to resolve an issue.  I appreciate it that students almost never call me about something frivolous—it’s always something important.  I also get text messages from students and even more emails.  That’s good.

I do try my best to answer you quickly, but truth be told, how quickly I can get back to you depends on when you contact me and what the issue is.  Some things are handled easily—I’ll pass along your concern to the vice president who is in charge of that issue, and they get to the bottom of it.  In other cases, the situation may be more complex than is obvious.  In that case, getting the answer or trying to solve the problem may take some time.  Most of the time I’ll email back and say I’m working on it, but in rare cases, I work on it and forget to email back because I get caught up in other things.  If you have tried to contact me and you don’t hear back within a day or two, all you have to do is send me a follow up message—just copy the original one and say “did you get my previous message?”

This last week has been pretty non-stop for me.  On Monday I was in the hospital for a routine test that people my age have to have every so often.  The folks at Canton-Potsdam Hospital were really excellent and provided top-notch care—the doctor was great, and the nurses that assisted me were all graduates of SUNY Canton, so I knew I was in good hands.  Both major hospitals in the county (CPH and Claxton-Hepburn in Ogdensburg) are of very high quality—I’ve had nothing but good experiences with both.

Whenever you’re out for a day, the work still piles up.  Because of that, Tuesday through Thursday consisted of non-stop meetings on one thing or another.  On Friday, I flew to Las Vegas for a quick visit to see my parents who live there.  It was great to see them.  Back in August, they celebrated their 63rd anniversary, which is quite an accomplishment.  My mom has some serious health issues, but my father is giving her lots of loving care and I’m hoping for the best.  I left Las Vegas at noon (Pacific Time) this past Monday, flew into Detroit and then to Ottawa, arriving at 10 PM (our time).  It always seems weird going into Canada to travel to another point in the United States.  Between going through customs and the drive from Ottawa back to Canton, it was midnight when I finally got home.

Since the work piled up again, there have been lots of meetings this Tuesday through Thursday.   On Friday I’m off again, this time driving to the Association of Council Members & College Trustees meeting in Fairport NY, where one of our students, Francesco Palumbo will receive a major award.  I’ll be back to Canton on Sunday, just in time for the Jewish New Year.  I’ll be out on Monday for the religious holiday, and then the cycle begins again.

To add to the list of things I needed to do, my iPhone also had begun to go wonky on me, and I wanted to deal with that before I traveled.  The glass plate was separating from the body of the phone, there was a small crack in the plate, Siri couldn’t hear what I would say, and I was even getting intermittent problems with being able to dial the phone.  I figured I would upgrade to the new model that just came out, but when I want to the Verizon store in Ogdensburg (the one near the Tim Horton’s), the new iPhones were on backorder.  They recommended that maybe I should get my phone repaired instead, and there was someone there who could do it.   Sure enough, the EZ Repair guy there took my phone and fixed it on the spot, taking care of all the issues, and had it done in less than half an hour.  How impressive is that?   I love the personal attention you can get at so many places in the North Country!  Now I’m all set for my trips and all is well with the world.

 

Constitution Day

Last Friday, SUNY Canton celebrated Constitution Day with a full slate of very cool activities.  The morning included a Constitution Trivia Contest (complete with red, white, and blue cupcakes) led by Hannah Ralston and Rachel Santose at the Southworth Library.  It also featured a visit from George and Martha Washington, ably portrayed by Nico Auguste and Molly Mott. 

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There was also a voter registration drive, and an additional 70 students registered.  Another drive was held the previous Wednesday at the student activities fair.  Lots of faculty and staff volunteered to help out with the contest and the voter drive.  If you haven’t registered to vote yet, get off your rear end and do it.  This is going to be an important election, and every vote counts.  Lots of people have fought and died to get the right to vote, and lots of people even today live in places where they don’t have that right.  Honor their lives and efforts by registering to vote, and then vote in November on election day.

I wasn’t able to attend the Trivia Contest since I was at Clarkson University at a North Country Regional Economic Development Council meeting during the morning, but I rushed back to SUNY Canton to host a lunch for N.Y. Supreme Court Judge Vito Caruso.  It was really interesting to meet with Judge Caruso in such a relaxed atmosphere and to talk about how similar our childhoods were and about some of the more unusual events in our lives.  He had a wonderful sense of humor and was very down to earth. 

Judge Caruso gave his formal presentation at 1:00 PM on the subject “The Constitution—Its Origins and Its Future”.  The talk was well attended by an appreciative audience of legal and political dignitaries, two chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and lots of students, faculty, and staff.  It was a very engaging talk, giving the history of the development of the Constitution, as well as some interesting comparisons between the Federal Constitution and the New York State Constitution, which actually predates it.  The New York Constitution is much longer than the Federal one and also contains certain rights that the Federal Constitution doesn’t have.

At the end of the speech, after answering several questions from the audience, Judge Caruso was presented with a proclamation from State Senator Patty Ritchie’s representative, Jim Reagan, and with a certificate of appreciation from me.

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The speech was followed by a reception on the Roselle Plaza, at the end of which Judge Caruso was presented with a proclamation from Assemblywoman Addie Russell. 

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I also had the pleasure of having dinner at the Alumni House with Judge Caruso, Steve Button (from the County Attorneys Office, who had arranged to bring the judge to campus), and several of the judge’s associates and their spouses.

It takes a veritable army to put together an event of this magnitude, so I can’t list everyone, but a lot of the work was done by the faculty and the Dean from our Business and Legal Studies programs (Profs. Stephanie Petkovsek (chair), William Jones, Alexander Lesyk, Christina Lesyk, Rosemary Phillips and Dean Jondavid DeLong); and our Special Events Coordinator DianeMarie Collins.  Thanks to everyone involved!

 

More Great Stuff!

  • Did you know that one of SUNY Canton’s online degree programs was selected as #1 in the country? It’s true—our B.S. program in Emergency Management was selected as the best by the Emergency Management Degree Program Guide.  Several others of our online programs are also in the top ten in the country in their areas, and our online programs in general were rated in the top 50 in the country!

 

  • Speaking of ratings, SUNY Canton jumped way up in the US News & World Report Best College listings, from #44 last year to #23 on the Regional Colleges—North list. We also drew praise for our diverse student body.

 

  • Our International Programs Office had a very successful event last Friday evening. Some of our international students joined up with some from SLU and visited Fobare’s Orchard.  There was a great turnout, and it was lots of fun.

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  • Back on September 15th, we had a ribbon cutting for the official open of our Financial Literacy Center. Located in Cook Hall, the Center offers several programs that should be of interest to students: free tax-preparation assistance, money management guidance, and loan repayment advice.  The Center is sponsored by Alesco Advisors, Prof. Daniel G. and Linda L. Fay, North Country Savings Bank, SeaComm Federal Credit Union, St. Lawrence Federal Credit Union, and the SUNY Canton College Foundation.

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What Is “FROM THE POUCH”?

FROM THE POUCH is a blog I write for SUNY Canton students.  During the fall and spring semesters, it comes out every week more or less, depending on how busy I am.  It consists of news, answers to student questions, and random thoughts that cross my mind.  There’s even a trivia contest in each issue—if you’re the first to get every question right, you win a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.  Even if you’re not the first, you get your name published in the blog, and that’s priceless!  I hope you enjoy it, and I’d love to hear your comments.

Best regards,

Dr. Zvi Szafran, President, SUNY Canton

 

 

Last Time’s Trivia Contest

Last time’s contest dealt with word that begin with the letter “L”.  We had a ton of entrants, and our fastest responder with all five correct was Tabitha Jaycox.  Just come to my office on the 6th floor of MacArthur Hall to get your prize, Tabitha—a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.

Others getting all four right (so better luck next time!) included Lee Meggison, Christine Matias, Ashley Paez, Cassandra Hughes, Anthony Romano, Christina Romanoski, Alicia Febus, Cassandra Jones, Robin Simmons, Savanna-Lin Boadway, Jessica Fischer, Tammy Zehr, Erwin Zahler III, Taylor Van Brocklin, Bryant Yates, Serina Six, Katja McCall, Kim Kurdziel, Zach Gagliardi, Briana Teele, Siani Smith, Jasmine Duvall, Crystal Francis, Brittany Leaty, Peyton Robinson, Robert Snow, Harley Woodruff, Samantha Heffernan, Allison Farnung, Breanna Ziser, Marissa Hall, and Rebecca Foote.

 

Here are the correct answers:

  1. Pop singer whose hits include “Poker Face”, “Paparazzi”, and “Born this Way”. Lady Gaga.
  2. Disney animated movie with main characters Simba, Mufasa, Pumbaa, and Timon. Hakuna Matata!  The Lion King.
  3. Type of computer you can carry with you.  Laptop.
  4. New Orleans is in this state.  Louisiana.

 

 

This Time’s Trivia Challenge

Continuing our trek through the alphabet, this issue’s challenge is about words that begin with the letter “M”. The first with all five correct wins a $10 Gift Card, good anywhere on campus. No looking up the answers now!  SEND ALL ENTRIES BY EMAIL TO answers@canton.edu since if you put them as a response on the BLOG, everyone will be able to see them.

  1. The “King of Pop”.
  2. She played Hannah Montana, and taught the world how to twerk.
  3. Comic book company that publishes Spider-Man, the Avengers, and the X-Men.
  4. Movie about a zebra, lion, hippo, giraffe and a bunch of penguins that escape from the Central Park Zoo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 20, 2016

FROM THE POUCH

Volume 3, Issue 3–September 20, 2016

 

How It’s Going

This is the time of year when everyone I meet asks how it’s going at the college, so let me answer that question.

We’re in the fourth week of classes, with our early warning system just completed to see which students are engaged and which of you aren’t.  We’ll be analyzing the results and reaching out soon to everyone having difficulty to offer help.   

This year’s new class looks great.  You’re off to a great start, and the average high school average was up a full point, too.  I haven’t heard the final enrollment results yet, but it looks like we’re up a little bit in enrollment—the residence halls are running about 43 ahead of last year, and that’s a good sign.   This obviously doesn’t just happen—our excellent admissions staff and the many others who help them work very hard to tell the SUNY Canton story to prospective students and work with them to answer any questions they may have.

The college is looking great too, with lots of improvements having been carried out over the summer by our always excellent buildings and grounds staff.  If you want a list of all the improvements, you can read them here.  We just did two ribbon cuttings to formally open the Rendezvous Café and Roo’s Court with lots of giveaways and other fun, and everyone is talking about how good the food is and happy about the expanded range of choices.  This is just part of the planned upgrades for our food service, and thanks to the fine folks working in our College Association.

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SUNY Canton is getting a lot of good press and we have done very well in the rankings.  In the U.S. News & World Report standings, we’ve moved up from #44 on the Regional Colleges—North list to #23, which is quite a jump.  Our degree programs continue to have top accreditations and lead to great jobs, and we got a clean sweep on our recent Middle States report.  We’ve been designated ‘Military Friendly’ again, and we’re in the top 10 for several online programs and for pet friendliness.  Our library and tutoring services were voted #1 in SUNY in a state-wide student survey.  All of this is due to our excellent faculty, superb student support staff, and captured by our top-notch public relations folks.  A lot of last year’s accomplishments were summarized in this year’s President’s Report, and you can read the digital version of it here.

Of course, it takes a lot of people make our college a conducive place for students to live and learn.  Our great student life staff make sure that there are lots of quality programs on campus for our students to enjoy outside of class, and make sure that our residence halls are nice places to live.  Our Athletics staff help our student athletes to reach their full potential, and our athletic teams proudly represent our College.  Our campus police make sure everyone is safe and secure.  Our student government officers help keep our campus active, and let old-timers like me know the student pulse on things. Our grounds crew keep the campus looking nice, despite the mess we all make.  Our Advancement folks raise money for scholarships, keep our alumni connected, and even found time to grill hot dogs at our residence halls for our students all week.

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As a result, because of all of you, I’m able to tell everyone we’re off to a fine start and hear them tell me what a great place SUNY Canton is.

 

 

Congratulations to… 

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…Francesco Polumbo, a junior majoring in Sports Management and member of SUNY Canton’s Baseball team, who has been chosen to receive the State University of New York Association of Council Members and College Trustees annual award for Excellence and Student Initiative Scholarship.  The ACT Award focuses on a student’s academic achievements and service to their campus and/or community.  The award includes a $1,000 scholarship for Palumbo and an additional $250 donation in the student’s name to the charity of his choice. Palumbo said his charitable donation will be made to Canton High School’s Golden Bear Booster Club.  The award will be presented on Saturday, October 1, 2016 at The WoodCliff Hotel in Rochester, NY.  You can read more about Francesco here.

 

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…The Early Childhood Education program, who co-hosted the annual Early Childhood Fall Conference together with the St. Lawrence Child Care Council on our campus on Saturday, September 17.  The two have collaborated and hosted this event for 10 years, which is attended by early care and education providers from our county and beyond, and offer a variety of workshops and presenters each year.  SUNY Canton faculty organizing the Conference included Dr. Maureen Maiocco (Program Director) and Ms. Christina Martin (Instructor & Student Teacher Supervisor), and student volunteers included Alexandria McIntosh, Alexis Ezidore, Molly Atkinson, Morgan Morse, Savanna-Lin Boadway and Katie Miller. Also in attendance were 6 SUNY Canton EC Alumni, who are all working in the field of ECE in child care centers, Head Start programs, and self-employed family child care home providers.

 

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…Prof. Charles Fenner, a faculty member in Business Administration, who competed in the “CapsimCore Professor Challenge against faculty across the country who acted as CEOs of manufacturing companies, making decisions about product lines, marketing tactics, and production.  How well did he do?  He came in 2nd­­ in a field of 240 (including faculty from Duke, Georgia Tech, U. Florida, and Pepperdine), which is pretty darn awesome.  Prof. Fenner won $2,000 worth of simulation software licenses, which will be offered free to students enrolled in his Introduction to Business course during the 2016-2017 online Winterterm session.

 

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…Courtney Bish, our Vice President for Student Life, who was recently selected to attend the 2017 NCAA Division III Athletic Direct Report Institute in Nashville, Tennessee this January.  Across the entire country, only 43 participants are selected through a nomination process, so the competition was high. The Institute focuses on improving the relationships between ADRs and their presidents, athletics directors and conference commissioners, and on enhancing the effectiveness of the ADR at the campus, conference and national levels.

 

 

9-11 Memorial

On Monday, September 12th, our Criminal Justice student organization did an exceptional job organizing a memorial ceremony for the 15th anniversary of the 9-11 attacks.  The ceremony was held at 7:30 PM at Roselle Plaza, where a gigantic American flag suspended from two firetrucks’ extended ladders served as the backdrop.

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The ceremony started with a bagpiper and military honor guard, followed by a prayer given by Minister Pedro Morales, from the 1st Baptist Church in Parishville, NY.  I gave the welcome for the event and read a poem by Billy Collins (the poet laureate of the Unites States at the time) that was first read before a joint session of Congress held in NYC one year after the attack.  This was followed by a wonderful and moving talk by Rob Parcel, a first-responder during 9-11.  After Minister Morales gave the benediction, the audience was invited to attach names of persons they wanted to honor to flags that lined the plaza.  We all then walked to our memorial tree by Payson Hall, and affixed a memorial wreath to end the ceremony.

It is critically important that we always remember those who were lost on 9-11, and the many first-responders who risked their lives, running toward danger, trying to rescue and protect.  The poem by Billy Collins is called The Names, and is full of haunting imagery about how the names of those killed are now part of the very fabric of the city.

 

The Names

Yesterday, I lay awake in the palm of the night.

A fine rain stole in, unhelped by any breeze,

And when I saw the silver glaze on the windows,

I started with A, with Ackerman, as it happened,

Then Baxter and Calabro,

Davis and Eberling, names falling into place

As droplets fell through the dark.

 

Names printed on the ceiling of the night.

Names slipping around a watery bend.

Twenty-six willows on the banks of a stream.

In the morning, I walked out barefoot

Among thousands of flowers

Heavy with dew like the eyes of tears,

And each had a name —

Fiori inscribed on a yellow petal

Then Gonzalez and Han, Ishikawa and Jenkins.

Names written in the air

And stitched into the cloth of the day.

 

A name under a photograph taped to a mailbox.

Monogram on a torn shirt,

I see you spelled out on storefront windows

And on the bright unfurled awnings of this city.

I say the syllables as I turn a corner —

Kelly and Lee,

Medina, Nardella, and O’Connor.

 

When I peer into the woods,

I see a thick tangle where letters are hidden

As in a puzzle concocted for children.

Parker and Quigley in the twigs of an ash,

Rizzo, Schubert, Torres, and Upton,

Secrets in the boughs of an ancient maple.

 

Names written in the pale sky.

Names rising in the updraft amid buildings.

Names silent in stone

Or cried out behind a door.

Names blown over the earth and out to sea.

 

In the evening — weakening light, the last swallows.

A boy on a lake lifts his oars.

A woman by a window puts a match to a candle,

And the names are outlined on the rose clouds —

Vanacore and Wallace,

(let X stand, if it can, for the ones unfound)

Then Young and Ziminsky, the final jolt of Z.

 

Names etched on the head of a pin.

One name spanning a bridge, another undergoing a tunnel.

A blue name needled into the skin.

Names of citizens, workers, mothers and fathers,

The bright-eyed daughter, the quick son.

Alphabet of names in green rows in a field.

Names in the small tracks of birds.

Names lifted from a hat

Or balanced on the tip of the tongue.

Names wheeled into the dim warehouse of memory.

So many names, there is barely room on the walls of the heart.

 

What Is “FROM THE POUCH”?

FROM THE POUCH is a blog I write for SUNY Canton students.  During the fall and spring semesters, it comes out every week more or less, depending on how busy I am.  It consists of news, answers to student questions, and random thoughts that cross my mind.  There’s even a trivia contest in each issue—if you’re the first to get every question right, you win a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.  Even if you’re not the first, you get your name published in the blog, and that’s priceless!  I hope you enjoy it, and I’d love to hear your comments.

Best regards,

Dr. Zvi Szafran

President, SUNY Canton

 

 

Last Time’s Trivia Contest

Last time’s contest dealt with word that begin with the letter “K”.  We had a ton of entrants, and our fastest responder with all five correct was Erwin Zahler III.  Just come to my office on the 6th floor of MacArthur Hall to get your prize, Erwin—a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.

Others getting all four right (so better luck next time!) included Ashley Paez, Alexis Carreau, Peyton Robinson, Erich Mattice, Misty Incitti, Brandi Dowdle, Lee Meggison, Anthony Clements, Brittany Leaty, Tylea Williams, Siani Smith, and Crystal Francis.

Here are the correct answers:

  1. Our mascot Roody is this animal.  Kangaroo.
  2. Superman was born here.  Krypton.
  3. Recording artist who did My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, Yeezus, and collaborated with Jay Z on Watch the Throne. Kanye West.
  4. Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz was from this prairie state.  Kansas.

 

 

This Time’s Trivia Challenge

Continuing our trek through the alphabet, this issue’s challenge is about words that begin with the letter “L”. The first responder with all four correct wins a $10 Gift Card, good anywhere on campus. No looking up the answers now!  SEND ALL ENTRIES BY EMAIL TO answers@canton.edu since if you put them as a response on the BLOG, everyone will be able to see them.

  1. Pop singer whose hits include “Poker Face”, “Paparazzi”, and “Born this Way”.
  2. Disney animated movie with main characters Simba, Mufasa, Pumbaa, and Timon. Hakuna Matata!
  3. Type of computer you can carry with you.
  4. New Orleans is in this state.

 

 

 

 

 

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September 6, 2016

FROM THE POUCH

Volume 3, Issue 2–September 6, 2016

 

 

 

The Semester Begins!

Fall semester has begun and I hope everything is going well.  Remember, our Early Warning System will be checking to make sure you are engaged in your classes at the end of week three of the semester, so be sure to go to class and turn in all assignments.  If you’re not engaged in your classes you’ll hear from us offering to help.  If you’re a no-show, you could lose your financial aid, so don’t let that happen.  You can find out more about our Early Warning System in the previous issue of the POUCH.

 

Safety First

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I’m happy to tell you that compared to most campuses and other locations in the United States, SUNY Canton is a very safe place to be. The incidence of crime of any type is quite low, and we have an excellent police force on campus and in the village. That having been said, we want things to be even safer here on campus. Here are some ways you can help.

 

IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING

If you see something that doesn’t look or feel right, contact someone who can help. That someone can be your residence hall advisor, a faculty member, campus police, or even me. It may be that a door has been propped open that shouldn’t be. It may be that you see someone pushing someone else around. It may be that you see someone staggering around who has had too much to drink. It’s way too easy to say “It’s not my problem” or “I don’t want to rat anyone out”, but in many cases, by doing nothing, you can be leaving a fellow classmate in real danger.

I’ve already heard about one incident on campus where someone was being pushed around and other students were present, but didn’t call anyone. That’s unacceptable—it’s never OK to push someone around. There are always better ways to handle a situation. If you see something, say something.

It may also be that you’ve noticed that a friend or someone on your residence hall floor is having a hard time of it. They’re on the razor’s edge. They seem depressed, they aren’t leaving their room, and their personal hygiene has deteriorated. You’re afraid something is wrong. You can let us know that you’re concerned by clicking here and filling out an anonymous referral form. We have a team of faculty and staff who meet every week to address issues like this, and only want to help. If you see something, say something.

 

GREEN DOT

Our Green Dot program is somewhat similar to IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING.  The Green Dot means that you should take action when you see something wrong going on.  It’s when you use your words or behavior to stop power-based violence from occurring.  Examples of power-based violence are sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, or dating violence. We refer to these acts of violence as red dots.

There are two types of Green Dots:

Reactive

Suppose you see a red dot occurring and you do something to stop it. It doesn’t have to be anything big, it can be something small. Examples of green dots are: asking a friend if they need help, sharing your concern with an RA, or taking someone who is in a risky situation to a location of safety.

Proactive

There are things we can do to stop red dots before they ever start. Examples of proactive green dots are: having a conversation with your friends about ending red dots, hanging a green dot poster in your residence hall, and asking your instructor to host a green dot overview talk in their class.

You Can Create Green Dots by:

  • Challenging jokes that minimize violence.
  • Making sure a friend who is incapacitated due to drugs/alcohol gets home safety.
  • Calling University Police if you see any high-risk situations. From a campus phone, call x7777; from a cell phone, call 315-386-7777.
  • Speaking up if you are concerned a friend is in an abusive relationship.
  • Leaving a party with the friends you came with.
  • Talking to your friends about the importance of being an active bystander.
  • Referring your friends to resources when they need help.
  • Talking to the students in your student group about the importance of looking out for each other.

And so many more! What’s your Green Dot?

Bystander Training.

You can maximize your impact as an active bystander by attending a Green Dot training. As part of the training you will build skills to recognize red dots, examine your own barriers towards taking action, and gain the ability to intervene early in situations that can lead to violence. You’ll learn about proactive and reactive green dots and figure out what green dots make the most sense for your life.

To request an overview talk or to attend a bystander intervention training, contact the Green Dot Team at greendot@canton.edu.

 

 

YES MEANS YES.

You may have read about various incidents of sexual violence that have occurred on other campuses. In some cases, those colleges responded well, supporting the victim while ensuring that the accused person’s rights were also respected. In other cases, the colleges didn’t do so well, leaving the victim feeling unprotected or jumping to conclusions without evidence.

At SUNY, we take the issue of sexual violence extremely seriously. We have comprehensive policies addressing how to support the victim and how to gather evidence so that the accused’s rights are protected. SUNY was the first university system to endorse Senator Gillibrand’s Campus Accountability and Safety Act bill, which provides support for victims of sexual assault on college campuses. Our own SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher made the following statement:

“SUNY has a long and unwavering commitment to combating sexual assault and we strongly support Senator Gillibrand in her efforts to make this pressing issue a national priority just as we have done here in New York. With resources, training, expert and caring staff from law enforcement to attorneys to student affairs all working together to protect and assist students, SUNY can and should be a national model. Under Senator Gillibrand’s leadership Washington is coalescing and is poised to act, making college campuses safer so we can grow our public mission of educating more students and educating them better than anywhere else in the world.”

I had the privilege of representing the SUNY presidents at Senator Gillibrand’s press conference announcing the Campus Accountability and Safety Act, and you can read her press release in its entirety here.

At SUNY Canton, our primary goal is for you to have a safe environment to study and learn in. We need all of our students to understand that yes means yes. This means that if you’re about to engage in a sexual relationship, you need to get a specific “yes” from your partner that they want to proceed before doing anything. You can’t assume that they mean “yes” by their actions. You need to ask. And most important—if your partner is drunk or otherwise incapacitated, their condition means that they CAN’T say “yes”. Only a sober person can say yes.

Too often, sexual relationships happen when one or both partners are intoxicated. Some students think that being drunk excuses them from responsibility from what happens next. It doesn’t. Aside from the obvious consequences of possible pregnancy or disease transmission, being intoxicated does not provide a defense against being prosecuted for rape. Being intoxicated does not indicate consent for sex. Yes means yes, and only a sober person can say yes.

If you engage in a sexual relationship with someone who is intoxicated, you are taking the very real risk that your partner will see things differently when they are sober. You may think they wanted to have sex. They may even say “yes”, but when they sober up, they may accuse you of having purposely gotten them drunk. You may even be accused of rape. That’s why it is important to understand: only a sober person can say yes.

When you are intoxicated, you’re not in control of your actions. Many times, people who are intoxicated do things they would never dream of doing when they’re sober. They ignore warning signs. They ignore when their partner is pushing them away. They think that pushing their partner down on the bed and forcing them to have sex is OK because in their intoxicated state, they think their partner wants it. Only a sober person can say yes.

If you push someone who’s intoxicated into having sex, especially if any level of force or coercion is involved, even if you’re intoxicated yourself, you are committing rape. Dating violence and sexual assault is never the victim’s fault or responsibility. If you’re the one pushing for sex, whether you’re intoxicated or not, it’s YOUR fault and responsibility. Yes means yes, and only a sober person can say yes.

 

EDUCATE YOURSELF

There are some excellent websites on how to end domestic violence and sexual assault. One of the best, which also has an extensive section on the current domestic abuse issues involving the NFL, is called No More, and can be accessed here. The state of New York also has a website for its Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, which can be found here. Spend a few minutes and look them over.

 

DANGER ON CAMPUS

Even though it doesn’t happen very often, whenever there is any danger on campus, you’ll want to know about it and know what to do about it.  Here’s how:

First—every student should be signed up for Rave Alert. That way, you’ll know when there’s an emergency on campus and be alerted as to what to do.  You should have already gotten email already, telling you that you have been enrolled, and asking you to enter your phone number so we can send you texts.  If you didn’t get the email, you can go to https://www.getrave.com/login/canton and sign in with your canton.edu email and password – then add your phone number(s).  There’s a link for this on the front page of the College’s website too.  If you haven’t signed up yet, drop everything right now and do it.

Second—even on the safest of campuses, unexpected things can happen. You should be alert to your surroundings. If you even have just a feeling that you’re being followed or are in danger, go quickly to a safe location and call the Campus Police (386-7777). Our police would much rather deal with a possible false alarm than have you be threatened by a dangerous situation.

Third—all students should know what to do if there’s a dangerous situation. And you need to know what to do before it happens. There is a useful video prepared by the City of Houston called Run, Hide, Fight that you should watch, which tells what to do in an active shooter situation (though the advice applies to many other kinds of dangerous situations). While the chances of this happening on our campus are very small, we still want you to be prepared. Please take six minutes to watch the video. It could save your life.

 

 

 

Three Vigils

As mentioned in the previous issue, our new co-Chief Diversity Officers and folks from our Student Affairs area worked together to have three vigils on campus, one each on August 30th, September 1st, and September 2nd.  The first was in memory of those who lost their lives in Orlando at the Pulse nightclub shootings on June 12th.  The second was in memory of black citizens who were killed in several terrible incidents this past summer.  The third was in memory of police officers who were killed in several terrible incidents that followed, also this past summer.

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All three vigils were held at the Memorial Rock near French Hall, and drew large, respectful groups of students, faculty, and staff.  Lashawanda Ingram, one of our co-Chief Diversity Officers, thanked the participants for coming, and introduced what the various parts of the vigils were going to be.  The first part in each case was a prayer from one of our campus ministers (Rev. Brian Drury, and Rev. Fred Sykes).  This was followed up by short talks by me and by Prof. Bill Jones, our other co-Chief Diversity Officer.  Lashawanda then invited the participants to share with the group by saying a single word describing their feelings about the event being remembered.  The words ranged from anger to fear to sadness to anguish.  The group then shared a moment of silence for healing.  The program for the vigils ended with a closing prayer.  Many of the participants also stayed behind a few minutes longer to talk with each other.

It’s really hard to know what to say at events like these.  Words seem insufficient to capture the feelings and emotions associated with such tragedies.  On the first day, to answer the questions of why we held the vigils, I told the story of the woman in ancient Greece who had died after a difficult life and was being ferried to the afterlife.  Charon, the ferryman, moved by the woman’s sad story, offered to let her drink a cup of water from the River Lethe, the river of forgetfulness—the last river crossed before entering heaven.  The woman asked if she would forget her pains from life, and Charon answered “yes, but also your joys”.  She asked if she would forget her failures, and Charon answered “yes, but also your successes”.  She asked if she would forget those who had betrayed her, and Charon answered “yes, but also those who loved you and who you loved in return”.  In final understanding, she declined the drink and said “I choose to remember everything”.  We must all be like this woman and choose to remember everything—to learn, to pay respect to the dead, and to do what we can to ensure that such tragedies never happen again.

 

 

SUNY Canton in the News

As many of you know, SUNY Canton has been named one of the top ten pet-friendly colleges in America.  The demand for space in the pet wing of our residence halls has been increasing, so this year we designated a second pet wing.  All 140 spots in the two wings have filled.  Well, the Syracuse Post-Standard picked up on this news, and published a very nice article entitled “What’s it Like to Live in a College Dorm That Has 100 Cats?” on August 29, which featured Syracuse-area resident Christina Romanoski, who is majoring in Veterinary Technology at SUNY Canton and is also a resident assistant in the hall, and our Director of Housing John Kennedy.  You can see the full article here.

Speaking of Syracuse, the New York State Fair was held there this week.  No, I didn’t go this year, but SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher did on SUNY Day, September 1, and gave a short talk about the high quality and low cost of the SUNY system.  During the talk, she mentioned that at various locations at the fair, you could pick up some swag from the various SUNY colleges, and then held up a pair of SUNY Canton sunglasses!  You can see that historic moment here—it’s at about 2:30 into the video.

 

 

What Is “FROM THE POUCH”?

FROM THE POUCH is a blog I write for SUNY Canton students.  During the fall and spring semesters, it comes out every week more or less, depending on how busy I am.  It consists of news, answers to student questions, and random thoughts that cross my mind.  There’s even a trivia contest in each issue—if you’re the first to get every question right, you win a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.  Even if you’re not the first, you get your name published in the blog, and that’s priceless!  I hope you enjoy it, and I’d love to hear your comments.

Best regards,

Dr. Zvi Szafran

President, SUNY Canton

 

 

 

Last Time’s Trivia Contest

Last time’s contest dealt with word that begin with the letter “j”.  We had a ton of entrants, and our fastest responder with all five correct was  Genna Goodman.  Just come to my office on the 6th floor of MacArthur Hall to get your prize, Genna—a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.

Others getting all four right (so better luck next time!) included  Ruffels Mackenzie, Anthony Romano, Bristol Woods, Gabriella Vega, Amanda Dahl, Alexis Carreau, Heather Gabetta, Nicole O’Brien, Miriah Mono, Kylie Currier, Kelly Hutchins, Rieanna Dupree, Valentin, Deangelo, Kayna Fenlong, Randi Conway, Charles Hanby, Jacobe Flanagan, Gage Emerson, Allison Farnung, Beoncia Chaplin, Lee Meggison, Jasmine Duvall, Peyton Robinson, Kaleb Morrow-Simmons, Brian Lennox, Erich Mattice, Tabitha Jaycox, Harley Woodruff, Olin Nahjae, Christopher Rock, Ellen Green, and Chris McCollum.   Here are the correct answers:

  1. It goes perfectly with peanut butter.  Jelly.
  2. Successful hip-hop artist, married to Beyonce. Jay Z.
  3. Star Wars knights.  Jedi.
  4. Actor that played Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean, John Dillinger in Public Enemies, Tonto in the Lone Ranger,  and the Mad Hatter in Alice in Wonderland. Johnny Depp.

 

 

This Time’s Trivia Challenge

Continuing our trek through the alphabet, this issue’s challenge is about words that begin with the letter “k”. Everyone with all five correct wins a $10 Gift Card, good anywhere on campus. No looking up the answers now!  SEND ALL ENTRIES BY EMAIL TO answers@canton.edu since if you put them as a response on the BLOG, everyone will be able to see them.

  1. Our mascot Roody is this animal.
  2. Superman was born here.
  3. Recording artist who did My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, Yeezus, and collaborated with Jay Z on Watch the Throne.
  4. Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz was from this prairie state.

 

 

 

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August 29, 2016

FROM THE POUCH

Volume 3, Issue 1–August 29, 2016

 

What Is “FROM THE POUCH”?

FROM THE POUCH is a blog I write for SUNY Canton students.  During the fall and spring semesters, it comes out every week more or less, depending on how busy I am.  It consists of news, answers to student questions, and random thoughts that cross my mind.  There’s even a trivia contest in each issue—if you’re the first to get every question right, you win a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus.  Even if you’re not the first, you get your name published in the blog, and that’s priceless!  I hope you enjoy it, and I’d love to hear your comments.

Best regards,

Dr. Zvi Szafran

President, SUNY Canton

 

 

Welcome Back!

Summer is now over and I’m sure we can all agree it went by extremely quickly.  It used to be that summer was a time for rest and refreshing of the brain cells, but for me at least, each year it actually gets busier.  I hope you had a good time and are rested up for what I’m sure will be a busy and engaging fall.  I took the week of July 4th as vacation, but really didn’t go anywhere then or the rest of the summer.  It’s so nice up here I don’t really feel the urge to travel except to the local rivers, lakes, and mountains.

 St. Lawrence River

The big change at the Szafran homestead is that we had a patio put in, and it turned out really well.  We had been thinking about having this done for a year or so, to fix up an area that had a honeysuckle tree that was overgrown and scratching at our window.  Provost Doug Scheidt beat us to it and had one put in at his house, and when I saw how nice it was, I hired the same guy (J&J Groundworks–I think the owner is a SUNY Canton graduate) to put one in for me.  It has been unusually hot this summer, with temperatures going into the 90’s on multiple occasions, and it’s a bit buggy when the sun goes down and it cools off, so I haven’t put the patio to as much use as I’d like.  The weather has been nice the past few days, so we’re now enjoying it, and will probably have a few barbeques in the near future.

Patio, Before

Patio, After

 The new patio before and after.

 

Get Off to a Good Start—Early Warning System

If you’re a new student at SUNY Canton, I want to remind you that it is extremely important to make a good start in your studies.  There’s a lot of evidence that students who get off to a good start in the first three weeks wind up doing well all semester.  To help, we have what we call an Early Warning System here on campus, where our faculty let us know which of our students are engaged in their studies (meaning that you show up to class, turn in your homework, participate, and have done well if there has been an early quiz or the like), which are not engaged (which means that you’re skipping too many classes, haven’t turned in your work, and don’t participate), and which are no-shows (meaning you essentially never showed up).  This happens at the end of week 3 of classes. 

If one or more of your teachers mark you down as not engaged, you’re going to hear from us.  We’re not trying to give you a hard time—we’ll be calling to offer you help and to make suggestions as to how to do better. It’s really bad if you’re a no-show, because that means we may have to cancel your financial aid and let the federal government know.

Here’s some data you should know:  Students who were “engaged” in all their classes had an average grade point average of 3.0, which is a “B”.  Students who had one or more “not engaged” grades had an average GPA of 1.5, which is a “D+”.  That’s a huge difference.  A good early start means a good finish.

Why do we do this?  Because we want you to succeed, do well in your classes, and eventually graduate.  Believe it or not, we do care about your success.

 

Challenge Coins

Something a little different we do at SUNY Canton is an idea that we borrowed from the military—when a soldier completes a difficult job, they are sometimes awarded with a challenge coin.  We do that at SUNY Canton too—if you complete the fall semester of your 1st year with a good grade point average, you win a special challenge coin—with Roody our mascot on the front side, and our college seal on the back.   

We started doing this in Fall 2014 with a 1st year coin, which is white in color (pictured above) and requires at least a 2.0 GPA to win it.  In Fall 2015, we added a 2nd year coin, which is green in color and requires at least a 2.33 GPA and having completed at least 36 credits. This year, we’re adding a 3rd year coin, which is blue in color and requires at least a 2.67 GPA and having completed 60 credits.  Finally, next year we’ll issue the 4th year challenge coin for those with at least a 3.0 GPA and having completed at least 84 credits.  This coin is a gold-colored beauty.

If you are going for an associates degree and have won both coins, or if you are going for a bachelors degree and earn all four coins, what do you get?  A special gift at the end, but you’ll have to earn the coins to find out what it is, because it’s a surprise.  So, meet the challenge and earn the coins!

 

  

Important Events Coming Up!

Please try to attend the following important events, all to be held at the Memorial Rock adjacent to French Hall.

 vigil poster

 

  

Grand Tour of Campus

While many of you will have been away for the summer, there are many new things that have recently been completed or that will be done this fall.  Folks have been really busy making our campus a more beautiful and welcoming place for everyone to enjoy.  Here’s a nice campus tour you’ll want to take to see them all:

When you first come onto the campus from Route 68, you’ll immediately see several beautiful flowerbeds, containing a riot of purple, white, and other colored blooms.

Zvi Flowers1

Along the side of Cornell Drive, you’ll see the new LED light poles which provide more light but consume less electricity.

Light

Something you won’t be able to see are the new underground gas lines that will assure our ability to keep the campus warm during the winter.  A bit further up the road at the Y, you’ll see the beautiful new electronic sign welcoming folks to campus, giving information about the day’s events, and providing directions to major campus buildings.

 Sign

Going left at the Y, next on our tour will be French Hall, with its beautiful new windows and entranceways, refurbished offices for Admission, Advancement, and Administration, and its newly repaved parking lot (Lot 8).

French Hall

On the grounds to the left of French Hall you can visit the Memorial Rock, a place for reflection, remembrance, and celebration of life.  The memorial was installed last February by our Student Government to remember Elliot Mullings, a well-liked student majoring in Criminal Justice: Law Enforcement Leadership who passed away in Spring 2014.

memorial-rock

The Memorial Rock was installed last February

Right alongside is the campus’ new Butterfly Garden.  It’s quite lovely with the plantings that have already attracted quite a number of butterflies and bees.  The Butterfly Garden was funded through a Campus Enhancement Award from the SUNY Canton Foundation, and students in Prof. Rajiv Narula’s Introduction to Environmental Science course and members of the Environmental Change Organization on campus will be responsible for its upkeep.

Butterfly Garden 

Continuing down the road, you’ll pass MacArthur Hall and Dana Hall (which will be renovated beginning next year) and come to newly paved Parking Lot 3.  If you stop there and walk over to Heritage Hall, you can see the newly renovated wing of that residence hall.  It’s quite nice, and our plans are to redo one wing every year until all the residence halls have been totally refurbished.

 

Room-2Bathroom

From there, continue around the loop, enjoy the beautiful views of the Grasse River on your left, and take a right turn on Miller Drive.  Go down to the end to Lot 13, and enter the Miller Student Center.  On the first floor, look for one of our two newly refurbished casual dining spots—the Rendezvous in the Underground Lounge—where you can get a sandwich, pizza, salads, and many other tasty items.

Rendezvous.jpg

Once you’ve eaten, walk upstairs to the second floor and head for Room 224, home of the College’s Ready Center, which opened last March and has offices of lots of helpful folks who would like to meet you.  The Center offers students help with advising, career services, and international programs.  It’s a great facility whose motto is “College Ready, Career Ready, World Ready”.

 ready1

The Miller Campus Center is so nice you’ll probably want to stay for quite a while, and if you do, in Room 222, we will be opening the new Center for Diversities and Inclusion this October.  The Center will be a great space for students to talk about issues related to diversity with our two new co-Chief Diversity Officers, Lashawanda Ingram and Bill Jones, as well as for small-scale events and just to hang out and learn more about the diversity that is one of our campus’ greatest assets.  With the support of North Country Senator Patty Ritchie, a grant was obtained to fund the renovations for the Center.  Two additional grants were obtained to support the Center—one for outreach to Native American students in the Akwesasne Nation, and one to support the Center’s programming.  Many thanks to Lashawanda, Bill, Doug Scheidt, Lenore Vanderzee (Executive Director for University Relations) and Courtney Bish (Vice President for Student Life) for their grant writing, planning, and support for this effort.

Now go out the front doors of the Miller Campus Center onto Roselle Plaza, and to your left you’ll see the newly refurbished Southworth Library, with its lovely windows and copper fixtures.  Stop in and say congratulations to the librarians, because the library was rated #1 in all of SUNY for both resources AND services!  The Cyber-café is located in the the library in case you want a cup of coffee and a dessert, and will be renovated later this year as well.

 Southworth

Now walk over to MacArthur Hall (the tallest building on campus, shaped like a cube).  In the unlikely event you’re still hungry, stop at the newly refurbished Roos Court (replacing the former JT’s), where they had a preview tasting this week, and I can personally attest that they look very nice and the food is quite good, with a variety of cool new offerings.

 Roos Court

For our final stop, take the elevator up to the sixth floor, turn right, and walk toward my office in Room 616.  As you walk you will see the updated Gallery of SUNY Canton Directors and Presidents.  It’s pretty darned nice, and the pictures have all been reframed and appear in date order, including the interim and acting presidents who served throughout our College’s history but weren’t represented before.

 Gallery

A huge thank you goes to the following people for their help on this project—Michaela Young (Assistant to the President), Greg Kie (Senior Media Relations Manager), Pat Hanss (Director of Physical Plant), Stan Robert (General Mechanic), The Frame Mill (Paul and Roberta Heer), and Mike’s Trophies.  When you’re done seeing the gallery, come in and say “Hi”.  I’ll be waiting to meet you.

 

 

This Time’s Trivia Challenge

This week’s challenge is about words starting with the letter “J”.  The first response with all five correct wins a $10 gift card, good anywhere on campus. No looking up the answers now!  SEND ALL ENTRIES BY EMAIL TO answers@canton.edu since if you put them as a response on the BLOG, everyone will be able to see them.

  1. It goes perfectly with peanut butter.
  2. Successful hip-hop artist, married to Beyonce.
  3. Star Wars knights.
  4. Actor that played Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean, John Dillinger in Public Enemies, Tonto in the Lone Ranger,  and the Mad Hatter in Alice in Wonderland.
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May 2, 2016

FROM THE POUCH

Volume 2, Issue 15 – May 2, 2016

 

Graduation is Coming…

It’s finals week, and graduation is coming this Saturday.  I can’t believe this semester has gone by so fast.  I hope everyone has studied hard for their finals and does well.  It’s been a good semester, filled with fun events, great speakers, winning athletics, and lots of other great things.   It’s wonderful to see the large majority of our students continuing to excel in their studies, research, community service, and campus activities.  Congratulations to all for another successful year.

 

 

Scholarly Activities Celebration

Speaking of successful students (and faculty), I attended the Scholarly Activities Celebration last Tuesday.  The Celebration consisted of two parts—a set of poster presentations at the Southworth Library from 12-2 PM and two parallel sessions of talks from 3-5 PM.  There were about 25 posters presented, as well as a dozen or so talks, so there was plenty to see and hear.

SAC3

At a lot of colleges, students are reluctant (or scared) to speak before the public, and the last thing that they’d want is for the college president to show up for their poster or talk.  I’m proud to say that wasn’t the case here—several students came up to me, took me by the arm, and wanted me to see their posters and hear their talk about them.  Invariably, the posters I saw were interesting and well presented.  I was only able to see a few of the talks, since I could only be in one room at a time and my schedule pulled me away a bit early.  Still, the talks I was able to attend were quite good, and the students presenting were well poised and had strong presentation materials.

There were a few faculty presenting posters and talks as well, and I was happy to see that two were in my own area of chemistry.  After hearing their presentations, I was able to ask a few questions and talk about the chemistry behind their results.  It’s always enjoyable to be able to talk about current research in your own field.

Congratulations to everyone who participated—presenters and advisors alike.  You did us all proud.

 

 

Celebrating Our Faculty

And speaking of successful faculty, we’ve already announced several Chancellor’s Award Winners, namely Prof. Fred Saburro for Excellence in Adjunct Teaching (see the March 21 “From the Pouch”) and students Codi McKee and Rebecca Burns for the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence (see the April 15 “From the Pouch”).

We have now heard about four other faculty who have won Chancellor’s Awards, and they are (drum roll please):  Ms. Michelle Currier (Library), who has won the Excellence in Professional Service Award; Prof. William Jones (Business Dept. Chair), who has won the Excellence in Faculty Service Award; Dr. Umesh Kumar (Finance), who has won the Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities Award; and Dr. Diane Para (Sports Management Program Director), who has won the Excellence in Teaching Award.

Please join me in congratulating them on their fine accomplishments!   Excellent faculty are among the foremost reasons that SUNY Canton is the great place it is.

 

  

Battle Buddies

Last Thursday, SUNY Canton held two events to celebrate our students who are veterans.  The first was to celebrate the creation of a Battle Buddy Center (a place for veterans to socialize and to access needed services) on our campus.  The Center is sponsored by the New York State Industries for the Disabled (NYSID), who presented the college with a check for $10,000.  The event was very nice, and started with a presentation of the colors by our local VFW post, followed by a welcome and several speeches.  Among the speakers were Mr. Paul Quirini from NYSID, Ms. Daphne Pickert from St. Lawrence NYSARC, Assemblywoman Addie Russell, and Mr. Jim Reagen from Senator Patty Ritchie’s office.  You can see a video talking about the event here.

NYSID Ceremony-SUNY Canton27

Afterwards, the college held its annual tree-planting ceremony alongside Mohawk Hall.  A tree was planted to honor Prof. Emeritus Will Fassinger (2nd from left, below), who has been a strong supporter of veterans for many years at SUNY Canton.

Tree Planting2

 Big thanks to Mr. Patrick Massaro (our Military and Veteran Student Service Coordinator) for planning the events, and to Ms. Lenore VanderZee (our Executive Director for University Relations) for stepping in to emcee.

 

Special Olympics

Last Saturday, for the fourth year running, SUNY Canton was the host for the North Country Region’s New York State Special Olympics Summer Games.  The event began with an opening parade of athletes from Canton, Massena, Potsdam, Malone, Waddington, Ogdensburg, Lisbon, DeKalb, Hannawa Falls, Norwood, and Norfolk.  After several awards were given, I had the pleasure of declaring the games officially open.  The athletes and volunteers looked so good, I just had to take their picture, and our Sports Information Director Nathaniel Hart took a picture of me taking it!

President

Here’s my shot:

Special Olympics

Events included 25, 50, 100, and 200 meter walks and runs, softball, javelin throws, soccer kicks, and basketball skill events.  There were about 175 athlete participants, along with an equal number of student-athlete volunteers from SUNY Canton to serve as buddies for the day to make sure that everyone got to the right venues, felt supported, and had a good time.  It was a wonderful event!

Solomon

Big thanks to everyone who helped plan and who volunteered to support the Special Olympics.

 

 

Trip to Albany

On Sunday the 17th, it was a beautiful day—sunny and hot, and almost everyone was out sunning themselves and having a fine time.  I began the day by attending the baseball game against St. John Fisher College.  Fisher is one of the top rated teams in the country, and unfortunately, they lived up to that reputation, winning by a score of 24-6.  I was going back and forth between that game and the women’s lacrosse game against Elmira College, where we won 15-7.  Our women have now set a team record with 11 wins this season, with one game remaining.

A cookout was held after the game, so I grabbed a hot dog and some water.  I had to run soon thereafter, because I had to catch the 4:30 PM flight from Ogdensburg into Albany to get there on time for SUNY Presidents meetings on Monday morning.  The trip went off without a hitch, and I got my rental car and went to the hotel.  After going to sleep that evening, at about 1:30 AM, my cell phone rang.  I had to take off my sleep apnea mask to answer it, and it turned out to be a recorded message from the airline that my flight that evening to Washington DC to attend SUNY Days would be delayed by an hour.  It’s not obvious to me why they needed to tell me about a flight delay at 5:30 PM at 1:30 AM, but there you go.  I put on the mask again and tried to get back to sleep, and two minutes later the phone rang again to repeat the message.

 

Presidents Meeting

Monday morning, the presidents of the Colleges of Technology within SUNY met at 9:00, and discussed some local campus issues.  At 10:00, we went to a meeting of all SUNY presidents that was called to discuss the budget.  When I said “hello” to the Chancellor, I found out that she had been called at 1:30 AM too, and was taking the same flight out that evening as I was.

The budget this year was a bit disappointing.  It contains no funds to cover salary increases (these are negotiated in Albany), no additional funds to cover the gap in the State’s Tuition Assistance Plan (TAP—campuses have to cover the gap between the awards the State gives and the smaller amount of money the State provides to fund them), no tuition increase, and no increase in funding for SUNY.  We’re happy that students’ tuition won’t be going up, but the lack of additional funds means that next year will be tight. We also discussed several ways we can work more efficiently together, and combine our individual efforts to support the whole SUNY system.

After the meeting ended, I drove back to the airport, returned the rental car, and waited for my flight, which was now supposed to leave at 6:30 PM.  As the time approached, there were a whole bunch of people from SUNY also waiting for it.  We got on the plane, began to taxi out, and then got an announcement that a warning light had come on regarding the plane’s hydraulic system.  We taxied back, got off the plane, and waited for them to check out the problem.  The maintenance crews had all gone home for the night, so they had to call them back to the airport.  They tried to fix it, but when they fired up the engines again, the warning light was still on.  Ultimately, they cancelled the flight.  Fortunately, we had anticipated this and put a hold on some seats on the 9:30 AM flight.  The airline switched our reservations, comped me for a hotel room for the night, gave me a food voucher, and put me in first class the next morning.  Not so bad.

 

 

In DC For SUNY Days

The next morning, we took off on time with me in first class, which basically meant a somewhat wider seat, coffee served in a mug, and a complimentary bag of snacks.  I got to Washington DC at almost exactly the same time as the College’s Executive Director for University Relations, who was attending SUNY Days as well.  The weather was just beautiful, with lots of sunshine and warm temperatures.We shared a cab to the hotel, checked into our rooms, and dashed off to the first SUNY Days meeting.

FullSizeRender

SUNY Days is a chance to meet with our legislators down in Washington DC to tell them about what we’re doing on our campuses, and to speak with them about major projects we would like to do that they might want to support.  After some meetings, we went to meet with Senator Chuck Schumer to discuss some of our plans at the college.  His assistant, Ms. Veronica Duran, was kind enough to take us around to catch up with the Senator, including for a ride on the subway underneath the capitol, which was very cool.  When we met, Senator Schumer was very supportive.  A bit later, we met with Senator Schumer’s and Senator Gillibrand’s staff members to discuss our needs and how they might be able to help us.

That evening, SUNY threw a party for alumni in the DC area and for our New York congressional delegation.  Each of the dozen campuses present had a table set up providing information about the college and usually providing some small giveaways.  Schenectady Community College had a leg up on the rest of us, because they had folks from their culinary program there serving petit-fours and other deserts, but we did well too, with a lot of people stopping by our table to get more information about the College.  One of the people who stopped by was our own Representative Elise Stefanik, who had helped secure the venue for the party and was giving a short speech supporting SUNY.

 IMG_1796

L-R: Ms. VanderZee, Me, Representative Stefanik

The next day, there were more meetings in the morning which included some presentations about what the upcoming election might mean for higher education.  In the afternoon, we had a very positive meeting with Representative Stefanik, who was very supportive of our main initiatives.  We invited her to speak on our campus as part of the Leadership series next fall, and I’m hopeful that her schedule will allow her to do so.

On Thursday, I took a taxi to the airport to catch my flight to Albany.  I put my bags in the overhead bin and took my seat, and after a few minutes, the main attendant for the plane came over and asked where my bags were.  I pointed to the bin overhead, and he said “please get them and follow me”.  I turned to the stewardess to see what that was about and she whispered “he’s putting you in first class”.  So, I would up being bumped up to first class in both directions of the trip.  Not bad at all.  After a somewhat long connection in Albany, I caught the flight to Ogdensburg, and was home at 4:00 PM.

 

 

And the Rest of the Week…

As you can imagine, since the only day I was on campus last week was Friday, there were lots of catch-up meetings and paperwork to sign.  One of the nicer meetings was with our student government officers.  Two of them are graduating this year—president Khaina Solomon and treasurer Fatizjah Burnett.  Both have done an exemplary job as student leaders, and are exceptionally nice individuals as well.  I’m sure they’re both going to do very big things in the future.  The students summed up the year from their perspective, and were all either sad to be leaving SUNY Canton or looking forward to next year.  They also introduced our new SGA vice-president, Fitzroy Saunders.

Friday night featured a Passover seder (ritual meal) at a friend’s house.  On Saturday, wife Jill, son Mark and I went to the baseball game against Utica College, which was also designated as a military appreciation game.  There was a color guard from the Golden Knights Batallion present, and three SUNY Canton alumni who had served in the military were honored and all got to simultaneously throw out the first pitch.  It was a very nice event, and we split the double header 4-5, 9-4.  I was also able to watch some of the men’s lacrosse game against SUNY Delhi, which we won 19-14.  The win means we also won the USCAA tournament against SUNY Delhi, Alfred State College, and the University of Dallas.

A Passover model seder was held on our campus last Wednesday evening.  A model seder is meant for a general audience who can be of any religion, or no religion at all.  The purpose is to tell what Passover is all about, including the various rituals.  It is also to show how Passover is a universal holiday, celebrating liberation.

 Seder4

About 40 people from the faculty, staff, students, and community participated, and the College Association catering staff really outdid themselves for this one—every single person commented on how nicely the tables were decorated and laid out, and how excellent the food was.  Tremendous thanks go to Mr. Steve Maiocco, Mr. Sean Conklin, and Ms. Sue Law and all the staff who helped plan, prepare and serve the wonderful meal.  We’re going to do it again next year in a bigger location so that more people can come, so look for the announcement next spring.

 

 

Last Week’s Trivia Contest 

Last week’s contest dealt with cities in New York.  Our winner was Darby Warf, who wins a $10 gift card good anywhere on campus.  Just come to my office on the 6th floor of MacArthur Hall to get your prize.  Others getting all questions right were Nicole O’Brien, Joe Bishop, and Brianna Perham.  Here are the correct answers:

  1. The Big Apple. New York City.
  2. The state capital.  Albany.
  3. Largest city in western New York.  Buffalo.
  4. Both the men’s and women’s basketball team from there made the final four this year.  Syracuse.

 

 

 

This Week’s Trivia Challenge

There isn’t one.  From the Pouch is going on summer vacation, so we’ll see you again in the fall!

 

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